Team UBoC: Good News x2

Two good news items have hit the blog desk this week:

The first is that UBoC’s first fully-funded doctoral student has graduated, following the submission of his thesis on “The Impact of changes in anthropogenic air pollutants on particulate air quality and the attributable burden of disease” – so, congratulations to Dr Ed Butt!

Dr Ed Butt

Says Ed, “I stared working with UBoC back in 2010 and became their first funded PhD student in 2013. Since then UBoC has grown considerably with (soon) 11 other PhD students now working on all kinds of exciting research projects relating to the world’s forests and trees.

I would like to thank UBoC for providing me with the opportunities and skills needed to successfully complete my PhD project. It has been a real pleasure working with everyone over these past years.

However, I won’t be leaving Leeds or involvement with UBoC now that my PhD has come to an end. I have just taken up a postdoctoral position on the DECAF project, which seeks to understand climate and air quality impacts associated with tropical deforestation. My role will be looking that local climate impacts.”

The second good news story is that UBoC has appointed a Tree Officer: Anna Gugan.

Anna Gugan

Anna explains: “I first encountered UBoC when studying for my Masters in Landscape Architecture at Leeds Beckett. Initially I volunteered for the University of Leeds I-Tree survey in the summer of 2017, and then used I-Tree as part of my Major Design submission, which focused on Harrogate.

When UBoC’s i-Tree researcher, Dr Hannah Walker, left to take up a post in Antarctica, I helped finish the tree survey and data processing. Being appointed to the new post as UBoC’s Tree Officer is a great privilege, and I’m looking forward to working further with i-Tree and other natural capital valuation tools, as well as helping with the development of UK planting projects, especially the White Rose Forest, which forms the Yorkshire section of the Northern Forest.




New Forest Twins: York, UK = Masaka, Uganda

Following a lecture at Bootham School to the York and District branch of the Geographical Association by Tom Bliss of the United Bank of Carbon, the branch very kindly raised a sum of £600, to be split 50/50 to support tree planting in the tropics and the UK.

As Tom had explained in his talk, the United Bank of Carbon (UBoC) promotes the twinning of woodlands in the UK (temperate forest) and Africa, (tropical forest) because each biome offers unique and complementary benefits, both for the climate and for local communities. Tropical trees work harder to fix CO2 than UK trees, while offering many social and other benefits for local people and wildlife, and UK trees offer key engagement features for UK donors, while also delivering valuable carbon and other benefits. So a donation allowing the creation of a new twinning was a perfect outcome for UBoC. Continue reading New Forest Twins: York, UK = Masaka, Uganda

Carbon-free to Antarctica

Hanna with a leaf from a species that we dubbed ‘Acer utterlihumungus’

Dr Hannah Walker, UBoC’s former i-Tree researcher, is heading down to Antarctica for five months with the British Antarctic Survey.

Not many trees there, you’re thinking. But this is a return to Hannah’s background in atmospheric science and a big change from her role in the i-Tree survey of the University of Leeds campus.

 

One fascinating tree on the university campus does, however, provide a link (not this one though).

 

Continue reading Carbon-free to Antarctica

New study helps conservationists assess climate change

An extensive new study co-authored by UBoC’s Jamie Carr will help scientists update conservation strategies, and understand how climate change is affecting species around the world, as we struggle to limit warming to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels.

Cat-Eyed Mangrove Snake – Boiga dendrophila. Photo by David Bickford. This Southeast Asian snake hunts in mangrove ecosystems, but rising sea levels as a result of climate change will result in habitat loss, threatening the species.

Continue reading New study helps conservationists assess climate change

Can Trees achieve 1.5 degrees?

UBoC’s Professor Piers Forster, who is also Director of the Priestly International Centre for Climate, and an Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Lead Author, has returned from Incheon, Korea, in good heart concerning the IPCC’s Special Report SR15, upon which he’s been working for the past week.

While much of the news is stark – we have only a very few years in which to act if we are to limit warming to 1.5 degrees above pre-industrial levels, and so reduce catastrophic climate change to something we hope will be at least manageable – it’s encouraging to see that the IPCC has identified reforestation as one of four key areas of action.

This map from Carbon Brief shows where afforestation is taking place around the world.

Continue reading Can Trees achieve 1.5 degrees?

United Bank of Carbon is a not-for-profit collaboration between businesses and environmental scientists, which protects and restores forests and other greenery, through environmentally and socially-responsible partnerships with local communities. We undertake research, support forest and woodland projects in the UK and the tropics that deliver CSR/PR benefits, provide carbon reduction consultancy, and help to arrange compensation for unavoidable carbon emissions