Terrific Tropical Trees: Kenya

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Thanks to their Trees for Life campaign Bettys & Taylors have been planting trees around the world since 1990. Right now they are working around Mount Kenya – a vital tea growing area for the family business. They are already supporting Kenyan tea farmers and schools in a long term project to plant one million trees which can be used to provide food, shade and shelter and improve the sustainability of the farms. They will now help to plant a further 5,000 Terrific Tropical Trees, many of which will be planted with Kenyan schools. The indigenous trees, planted in partnership with the Kenyan Tea Development Agency, will help students to understand the importance of conservation. They’ll also provide shade for the school children to play and learn outdoors.

“We are delighted to be involved in the Terrific Tropical Trees legacy project. From the tree planting work we have done with schools both here in the UK and abroad we’ve seen how much they can help school children to benefit from and appreciate their outside environment. We hope that pupils taking part in the project will enjoy learning about how trees are making a difference to their peers in countries far from their own.” Simon Hotchkin, Head of Sustainable Development

Project Update:

The overall aim of this project is to improve the awareness of school children and their communities of the benefits of environmental conservation and tree protection by planting 5,600 trees. The project will be carried out by the Kenyan Tea Development Agency (KTDA) Foundation in 14 tea factories with each factory nominating two schools – a total of 28 schools.

The KTDA Foundation plans to work closely with local stakeholders to ensure the long term success of the project – including local partners involved in environmental conservation, factory management and board teams, school administration, policy makers and community members.

Adopt a Tree Campaign

Much of the tree planting will be done during ‘tree planting week’ – an educational week focused on environmental conservation, which will be championed by The KTDA Foundation in close partnership with schools and factory management teams. The  new strategy, “Adopt-a-tree” with the schools involved in the project is to encourage students to take care of the trees as well as create ownership for sustainability of the project benefits. Students will be able to “adopt” their own tree, deepening their awareness of individual trees over time and encouraging a greater understanding and appreciation of their local environment.

Students will be rewarded with prizes to encourage them to continue taking care of the trees and be seen as role models to motivate other students to follow suit. It’s expected that over 8,680 students, teachers and community members will be involved directly in the project in environmental education and tree planting to ensure that the trees are taken care of and survive even during the dry spells.

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United Bank of Carbon is a not-for-profit collaboration between businesses and environmental scientists, which protects and restores forests and other greenery, through environmentally and socially-responsible partnerships with local communities. We undertake research, support forest and woodland projects in the UK and the tropics that deliver CSR/PR benefits, provide carbon reduction consultancy, and arrange offsetting for unavoidable carbon emissions